QNX BIOS for Intel Architecture

April 20, 2009

Ever since we announced QNX Fastboot for Intel Architecture I repeatedly get asked about how we make this work with the BIOS. Are we customizing the BIOS? Are we putting secret code before the BIOS and then bringing up the BIOS in a special way? Well there are two ways to clarify this:

1. THERE IS NO BIOS!

2. With QNX, you are now able to recieve a custom BIOS as a part of the Neutrino package.

Effectively, through our license agreement for the Z500 processor family (commonly known as the Atom), QNX has become a BIOS vendor. Albeit, we provide a dramatically customized (reduced) start up library that is device and application specific in line with our deeply embedded, high reliability focus.

As  a part of this, customers now have the option to engage the QNX services team to write their own custom start up (again, think BIOS) for their Intel Architecture devices. (Currently we’re only licensed to do this for the Z500 series processors, however we’re eager to start discussing new processors). This approach has the benefits of custom performance optimizations, i.e. it boots fast and can faciliate fast connectivity for things like CAN, Profinet, EtherCAT etc., and eliminates the BIOS from the BOM cost, the more units you ship the more you save.

So if you are thinking about the Intel Architecture for your next industrial or medical design but are frustrated with your current BIOS, please drop us a line to explore how we might resolve this.

You can test out our Fastboot IPL on the Kontron nanoETXexpress-SP module. Please download it here: http://community.qnx.com/sf/wiki/do/viewPage/projects.bsp/wiki/Bspdown_kontronnanosp

Kroy Zeviar

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Intel, BMW and QNX?

February 17, 2009

intel-car-21Intel asked me for a QNX logo to put on the outside of a car so I asked them for a picture of said car. This is a BMW with a Harman Becker infotainment system based on an Intel Atom hardware platform running QNX and our latest Aviage HMI and multimedia suite.

Obviously this car and the fact that QNX is in it, is not a secret. The irony for me is that two of the parties involved in this demo, Intel and BMW, supported a Wind River press release last May all about the next generation IVI stack they were developing on Linux. Its well over six months later and as far as I can tell, no one’s driving Linux around in a BMW.

QNX continues to push forward with products that are shipping today, way ahead of our competition. We really do put the show on the road.

by Linda Campbell


What it means: Foundry 27 & The Intel C++ Compiler Professional Edition for QNX Neutrino RTOS

November 28, 2008

intel_compiler_image

Hello to the QNX Developer Community!

This is my first blog to you about the goings on in our ‘Tertiary Matters’.

Ostensibly this post is to let you know we just added a link in the Bazaar, on Foundry27, to the new beta edition of The Intel C++ Compiler Professional Edition for QNX. Hereafter referred to as the Intel Compiler.

But “Hey what?” you may be saying to yourself, “Foundry?@, Bazaar?)*% Bizar?^%.”

So let’s take a step back and refresh you on what we’re up to at QNX and why the posting of the Intel Compiler is important. But first the disclaimer:

Whenever they let me out of the office, I always preface to customers and partners that I have the distinction of being the only philosophy major on our product roadmap team. I am decidedly untechnical and highly philosophical. So, my postings will lean on the side of trying to understand what things mean, greater significance and the like. I’ll leave the technical drill downs to the experts. Now a few facts:

In September of 2007 we launched Foundry27 (F27), our community portal and introduced our hybrid software model of published source coupled with commercial licensing. In the first year we achieved the following portal milestones:

  • 21, 000+ developers
  • almost 600 posts per month
  • 43 Active Projects: including 5 silicon, 3 community, 2 customer, 14 public

Based on the activity we see and comparative benchmarks, the transition to our new business model has been a tremendous success!

In 2009 we’re looking forward to the first community code drops, new silicon vendor developed BSPs, and rewards and incentives for your participation in Foundry27. We’re even looking at the possibility of interactive hardware roadmaps where you, the developer, can provide input into what hardware you would like prioritized in our development labs.

What’s the significance of the Intel Compiler showing up on Foundry27? It means that the QNX community is thriving,  attracting investment from hardware vendors so that you can benefit from a healthy and vibrant QNX ecosystem.

I hope you’ll request the beta of the Intel Compiler and give us feedback – let us know if it improves your development efforts on the Intel Architecture. You can find it here – follow this link to the Bazaar and then scroll down to Cross Development Tools:

http://community.qnx.com/sf/wiki/do/viewPage/projects.bazaar/wiki/Software_Directory

Initial reports are glowing.

Best, Kroy